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Why does Tilton School have so few clubs?

A ping-pong club, a dance club, a robotics club or a gaming club. These are clubs that once existed in the history of Tilton. Over my past two years at Tilton, I’ve seen many people attempt to start a club, many of which I had an interest in participating, but none left standing today. I remember when I was in middle school trying to picture a colorful high school life, and for some reason, the various clubs after school where people can get together and share their interest and passion were always part of that life. So why does Tilton have so few clubs? And why do the past clubs never get a chance to sustain, for the exception of two clubs, the Tiltonian, and the math club? (which are both run by Eva, and I’m honored to be a part of both)

“And everybody knew that the most valuable thing was free time.” This was a line in one of my recent readings, and the more I think about these questions, the answers tend to lead to one problem: time. In Tilton, everyone runs a schedule where classes start at 8:25, followed by sports from 3:30 to dinner, less than an hour of free time and then study hall. When school and sports tire us out for most of the day, the only bit of free time where we could socialize with our friends or just relax seems truly valuable. It would take a lot of commitment from someone to devout that free time to a club regularly. And on Sundays when everyone gets to sleep in and just relax for a day, it’s even harder to gather a group of exhausted students together. I don’t even remember how many times I had to force myself out of bed on a Sunday afternoon to attend math club. It even harder to try to get my friends to go with me. I don’t blame our laziness, because I acknowledge how much stress our schedules bring us, and a moment to rest could not be easily taken away.

Even if we all could use the busyness as an excuse, I still think the main issue with our generation is the lack of passion. I’ve seen many kids fall into the bottomless pit of video games, social media or other attractions in our lives. I was one of them, but I began to see my addiction and am fighting to get rid of it. I call this day and age the best and the worst for our young generation. The best age being peace, a decent life, and a myriad of opportunities in the world for us to explore. The worst age is also a side-effect of technology, as there are so many temptations out there which teenagers are a victim of. The only reason we have all these wonderful technologies that serve us in everyday life is because of the unique curiosity to explore the world that we humans have. But the very product of our curiosity is starting to diminish it from us. I think our school and the student government should really support the students in following their passions. From what I’ve seen, the complication of starting a club almost seem intimidating to someone who just wants to do something they like. There’s a requirement to present to the whole student government and even the IMT in some cases, and I think there’s really no point in making this process as difficult it is right now. I’ve suggested several ideas to simplify the process but have seen little change.

“You often feel tired, not because you’ve done too much, but because you’ve done too little of what sparks a light in you.” I’ve thought about this quote a lot since thinking about this article. I remember all the times when I had a light spark in me, and the joy of doing something I truly love. High school is a great place to find your passion. We should really start to lift our head from the screens and start seeing the world around us, and you’ll be surprised at how much fun there is alone the way.

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